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Sixth Set of Funding Awardees

On January 26, 2022, the FCC released a Press Release announcing the COVID-19 Telehealth awardees.

WASHINGTON, January 26, 2022—The Federal Communications Commission today approved an additional 100 applications for funding commitments totaling $47.89 million for its COVID-19 Telehealth Program. This is the FCC’s sixth and final funding announcement of approved Round 2 applications. The FCC’s COVID-19 Telehealth Program supports the efforts of health care providers to continue serving their patients by providing reimbursement for telecommunications services, information services, and connected devices necessary to enable telehealth during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“The pandemic has forced us to think differently about how to deliver health care services and the FCC has risen to the challenge through a number of telehealth programs, including our COVID-19 Telehealth Program,” said FCC Chairwoman Jessica Rosenworcel. “From offering remote behavioral health services in Decatur, Illinois to supporting the underinsured and those living below the poverty line in Dade City, Florida, the health care providers announced today offer just a snapshot of the breadth of connected health care services this program has helped support in the past year. I want to commend the work of our team in the Wireline Competition Bureau for their dedication to this program that has made such an impact on our nation’s doctors, nurses, and their patients.”

Round 2 is a $249.95 million federal initiative that builds on the $200 million program established as part of the CARES Act. The FCC took action last year to develop a system for rating applications factoring in the hardest-hit and lowest-income areas, Tribal communities, and previously unfunded states and territories. Over the course of two funding rounds, this program has approved 986 awards to providers in each state, territory, and the District of Columbia.

Below is a list of health care providers that were approved for funding in this final wave (listed alphabetically):

  • Adams County Regional Medical Center in Seaman, Ohio was awarded $498,756 to purchase telemedicine carts and other connected medical devices, which will allow providers to remotely conduct thorough health care assessments and improve patient health outcomes.
  • Advantage Care Diagnostic and Treatment Center in Glen Head, New York was awarded $572,310 to purchase tablets, cameras, monitors, laptops, headsets, and other connected devices to expand its telehealth capabilities.
  • AMH Comprehensive Medical Centers in Los Angeles, California was awarded $33,335 to purchase computers and monitors to expand telehealth care services at three different clinic locations across Los Angeles County.
  • Arkansas Valley Regional Medical Center in La Junta, Colorado was awarded $339,501 to purchase infrastructure upgrades, including upgraded network capabilities, to support growing telehealth needs.
  • Augusta University in Albany, Georgia was awarded $102,328 to purchase tablets and ultrasound devices that transmit images remotely, in order to provide diagnostic services to patients with respiratory issues, potential and confirmed COVID-19 infections, and others with COVID-19-like symptoms.
  • AWARE, Inc., in Anaconda, Montana was awarded $457,603 to purchase laptops, software, and wireless access points to improve the connectivity of their telehealth program, enhancing providers’ capabilities to offer quality, accurate, and timely remote care for vulnerable populations.
  • Berkshire Healthcare Systems in Pittsfield, Massachusetts was awarded $835,068 to purchase remote telehealth peripherals, laptops, tablets, secure video licenses, and wireless network infrastructure to upgrade their network capacity to accommodate advanced telehealth services while also enabling residents to connect with families while in isolation.
  • Betty Jean Kerr People’s Health Centers in St. Louis, Missouri was awarded $218,741 to purchase computers, phones, tablets, and networking devices, which will allow providers to remotely care for and assist patients with chronic illness, reducing the risk of COVID-19 transmission.
  • Bluestone Health Association of Princeton, West Virginia was awarded $169,383 to purchase telemedicine carts, monitors, laptops, desktops, and other telehealth equipment that will help health care staff to provide quality healthcare remotely.
  • Cabell Huntington Hospital in Huntington, West Virginia was awarded $493,888 to purchase webcams, laptops, and desktop computers to facilitate synchronous communication with patients and providers and to monitor and provide primary care services to COVID-19 patients, among other telehealth services.
  • California Rural Indian Health Board, a consortium of six health care providers in California, was awarded $638,914 to purchase telemedicine carts, Bluetooth-enabled medical devices, computers, and telecommunication video licenses to improve access to primary care for rural residents, improve the remote monitoring of patients, and continue the care and monitoring of at-risk patients.
  • Canyonlands Community Health Care in Page, Arizona was awarded $506,702 for laptops, tablets, servers, web cameras, computers, patient telehealth platforms, and privacy and communication licenses to improve patient care, expand their telehealth services, and enhance remote monitoring.
  • Catholic Medical Center in Manchester, New Hampshire was awarded $1,000,000 to purchase laptops, tablets, and data plans to allow for remote patient evaluations and enhance other telehealth applications.
  • Children’s Hospital of Wisconsin in Milwaukee, Wisconsin was awarded $447,400 for tablets and telehealth software to enable clinicians and staff to remotely monitor patients, decreasing the risk of COVID-19 exposure.
  • Christus Health in Irving, Texas was awarded $734,675 to purchase laptops, tablets, telehealth carts, and remote patient monitoring equipment to more effectively reach remote patients and to increase capacity for virtual care.
  • Cibola General Hospital in Grants, New Mexico was awarded $152,398 to purchase remote patient health monitoring equipment, which will be provided to providers and patients and provide consistent care and access to patient information.
  • City of Hope National Medical Center in Duarte, California was awarded $215,300 for laptops, tablets, cameras, headsets, and telehealth carts that will enable their providers to increase telehealth service offerings.
  • Clara Martin Center in Randolph, Vermont was awarded $128,517 to purchase laptops and remote monitoring devices, and to expand wireless capabilities to help minimize the effect of the limited transportation options in the area, aiding in maintaining regular patient and treatment provider contact.
  • Cobre Valley Regional Medical Center in Globe, Arizona was awarded $449,201 to purchase video conferencing subscriptions, tablets, and network hardware to connect providers directly with patients for COVID-19 follow-up care, as well as to maintain consistent communication for patients with chronic care needs.
  • Coleman Professional Services in Kent, Ohio was awarded $631,836 to purchase laptops to provide uninterrupted, secure, and reliable audio-visual telehealth services to their patients and expand their telehealth capabilities.
  • University of Colorado School of Medicine in Aurora, Colorado was awarded $691,230 to purchase computers, phones, and networking devices to improve access, remotely manage care for patients, reduce patient and provider exposure, and conserve vital personal protective equipment for caregivers.
  • CommuniCare Health Center in San Antonio, Texas was awarded $556,846 for mobile devices, such as phones and software, to expand their current telemedicine program, thereby increasing access to care for new and existing patients throughout the community.
  • Community Foundation Northwest Indiana in Munster, Indiana was awarded $539,840 to purchase computers, monitors, webcams, headsets, tablets, and network connection devices to increase their capacity to provide a variety of telehealth care services to patients.
  • Community Health Alliance of Pasadena, a system of health care providers in California was awarded $248,024 to purchase connected health monitoring devices and prepaid data plans to help provide safe and accessible care for high-risk and vulnerable patients within the community who would otherwise struggle to maintain connectivity.
  • Community Health Center of Yavapai in Prescott, Arizona was awarded $915,985 to purchase remote patient monitoring devices, telemedicine carts, internet connectivity, and Wi-Fi infrastructure upgrades to enable mobile provider care, maintain telehealth monitoring for patients with high-risk medical conditions, handle a greater volume of telehealth visits to promote social distancing, and increase access to low-income, uninsured patients without smart phones or internet service.
  • Community Health Partnership of Illinois in Chicago, Illinois was awarded $237,738 to purchase computers, video monitors, smart scales, blood pressure monitors, and blood glucose monitors, which will support patient monitoring and care management and help to reduce hospitalizations.
  • Community Health Systems, Inc., a consortium of six providers in California, was awarded $33,320 to upgrade its phone system to improve patient experience for its 11,000 patients, the majority of whom are living below the poverty line and are underinsured or uninsured.
  • Community Hospital, Inc., in Tallassee, Alabama was awarded $46,323 to purchase telehealth equipment, computers, and software to conduct patient visits and assessments remotely.
  • Credo Community Center for the Treatment of Addictions in Watertown, New York was awarded $541,077 to purchase laptops, tablets, and telehealth software to conduct health assessments, individual and group counseling, peer services, care management, and medication management.
  • Creek Valley Health Clinic in Colorado City, Arizona was awarded $241,586 to purchase remote patient monitoring devices, such as pulse oximeters, blood pressure devices, thermometers, and to provide loaner tablets to patients who may lack access to the devices needed to utilize telehealth care.
  • Dayton Children’s Hospital in Dayton, Ohio was awarded $938,136 to purchase telehealth equipment, including tablets and remote monitoring devices, which will support their growing need for virtual consults and reduce the number of clinicians necessary for hands-on care, in turn reducing exposure to COVID-19.
  • The Dickinson County Healthcare System in Gaylord, Michigan was awarded $1,000,000 to purchase webcams, tablets, and remote patient monitoring devices to facilitate the provision of telehealth and meet the increased patient demand for telehealth services while reducing the spread of COVID-19.
  • East Carolina University in Greenville, North Carolina was awarded $367,900 to purchase remote patient health monitoring equipment, tablets, and data plans which will allow physicians and dentists to perform safe remote examinations in community settings and patient homes.
  • Edgewater Health in Gary, Indiana was awarded $411,750 to purchase tablets, digital cameras, and telemedicine platform software to enhance and expand their primary care and behavioral health telehealth service offerings.
  • Equitas Health in Columbus, Ohio was awarded $263,045 to purchase laptops, tablets, and remote patient monitoring kits for improved monitoring of high-risk patients who may be living with chronic illnesses.
  • Family Counseling Center in Kennett, Missouri was awarded $163,900 to purchase tablet devices and software to deliver telehealth services to patients in Southeastern Missouri, where lack of transportation can pose a significant barrier to care in the largely rural area.
  • Glencoe Regional Health Services in Glencoe, Minnesota was awarded $53,688 to purchase video-capable laptops and other telehealth devices which will help to enhance the telehealth services and ensure that patients who are unable to seek care in person are able to access remote care.
  • Great River Medical Center in Blytheville, Arkansas was awarded $134,645 to purchase telehealth software and upgraded communications devices to improve patient outcomes by sharing information including COVID-19 electronic lab results, immunizations, and other patient health information across rural areas.
  • Health West, Inc., a system of providers throughout Idaho, was awarded $774,240 to purchase computers, accessories, cameras, data and privacy software, routers, and telecommunications software licenses to improve and enhance telehealth services and create a robust network to support telehealth services going forward.
  • HealtHIE Georgia, a system of providers throughout the state, was awarded $923,986 to purchase telehealth carts, laptops, tablets, and remote patient monitoring devices to enable remote care, coordination, and telehealth for residents of underserved rural Georgia.
  • HealthNet in Indianapolis, Indiana was awarded $620,007 to establish a system of virtual telephone visits and real time video conferencing to enable the center to increase patient access by reducing barriers to care and more effectively care for patients with COVID-19 who may be discharged from the hospital or recovering at home.
  • Herald Christian Health Center in Rosemead, California was awarded $604,854 to purchase laptops, computers, accessories, servers, and routers to increase their network’s capacity to support expanded telehealth service offerings and improve access to care.
  • Heritage Behavioral Health Center in Decatur, Illinois was awarded $294,000 for telehealth devices and software subscriptions to facilitate remote access to video telehealth services.
  • Heritage Health and Housing, Inc., in New York, New York was awarded $701,277 to purchase servers and tablets to increase telehealth services and enhance remote patient monitoring to provide vital services to their underserved community.
  • High Country Community Health Center in Boone, North Carolina was awarded $495,429 to purchase tablets and other connected devices to enhance and facilitate their telehealth services and remote monitoring program.
  • Hill Country MHDD Centers, a system of 15 providers throughout Texas was awarded $847,968 to acquire laptops and security software services which will allow providers to replace outdated desktop equipment, improve mobility of staff, and allow staff to provide better assistance to their patients through quicker access to internal systems.
  • Hocking Valley Community Hospital in Logan, Ohio was awarded $410,647 to purchase laptops, tablets, remote monitoring devices, Wi-Fi services, and telehealth software to provide patient care in COVID-19 isolation rooms, allow for remote home monitoring with virtual check-ins, and for virtual treatment of opioid addiction.
  • Houlton Regional Hospital in Houlton, Maine was awarded $277,934 to purchase devices, including tablets and telehealth carts, and software, that will support and connect patients to both primary care and specialty care physicians.
  • Jamaica Hospital in Jamaica, New York was awarded $925,912 to purchase laptops, tablets, mobile phones, and patient monitoring cameras to equip providers with the necessary tools to conduct virtual telehealth visits and consultations, and to improve access to primary and specialty care and reduce strain on the hospital.
  • Kadlec Regional Medical Center in Kennewick, Washington was awarded $762,420 to purchase patient monitoring kits that contain tablets, software, and accessories to monitor high-risk patients’ vital signs at home to avoid unnecessary COVID-19 exposures.
  • Kaweah Delta Health Care District in Visalia, California was awarded $994,003 to purchase tablets, software, and shared computing services to keep up with increasing telehealth demands and provide improved telehealth service to its patients.
  • Kern County Hospital Authority in Bakersfield, California was awarded $600,320 to purchase tablets, laptops, monitors, and other telehealth devices to provide primary and specialty care services remotely.
  • Lakewood Health System in Staples, Minnesota was awarded $376,200 to purchase devices essential to their Remote Patient Monitoring program, including tablets, connected weight scales, pulse oximeters, and blood pressure monitors to provide telehealth services to patients.
  • Los Angeles Christian Health Centers in Los Angeles, California was awarded $47,219 to purchase mobile devices and laptops for use by hard-to-reach patients, including those who may be experiencing homelessness, so they can continue to access medical care.
  • University of Louisville Health in Louisville, Kentucky was awarded $571,652 to purchase telemedicine software, mobile phones, data plans, webcams, and network equipment to conduct telehealth visits and ensure quality health care throughout the pandemic.
  • Marion General Hospital in Marion, Indiana was awarded $716,050 to acquire telemedicine carts, tablets, peripherals, and bidirectional audio-visual equipment to expand telehealth capabilities.
  • McLeod Regional Medical Center of the Pee Dee, as part of a system of hospitals in South Carolina was awarded $764,309 to implement wireless network infrastructure upgrades, and to purchase other telehealth equipment, such as headsets and cameras, that will increase their telehealth service capacity while reducing the exposure and spread of COVID-19 throughout the hospitals.
  • Mercy Foundation in Roseburg, Oregon was awarded $375,768 to purchase a telehealth platform system to implement rural school-based telehealth clinics, providing direct access to primary care and increasing the number of children who have access to quality healthcare.
  • The Michigan Masonic Home in Alma, Michigan was awarded $519,532 to purchase telemedicine kits and remote monitoring devices to provide telemedicine services to the senior population of the area, due to their susceptibility to health complications during the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Morehouse Healthcare in Atlanta, Georgia was awarded $907,235 to purchase remote patient health monitoring equipment and software, which will enable providers to monitor patients, provide frequent check-ins, and easily conduct provider-to-provider consultations.
  • Mount Sinai Medical Center in Miami Beach, Florida was awarded $925,208 to purchase video cameras, tablets, computers, servers, telehealth software, and telehealth carts to enhance patient care and to improve communication internally and between patients and their families.
  • Multi-Cultural Health Evaluation Delivery System in Erie, Pennsylvania was awarded $80,137 to purchase computers, tablets, phones, and remote monitoring devices to allow providers, interpreters, and patients to connect more easily with each other and to have a higher level of quality for telehealth visits.
  • Navicent Health in Macon, Georgia was awarded $549,463 to purchase telehealth carts, video conferencing software, clinical workstations, and phone solutions to support and enhance their telehealth services for patients.
  • Neighborhood Health in Alexandria, Virginia was awarded $968,632 to acquire laptops, telemedicine carts, monitors, tablets, phones, servers, secure internet services, and connected devices, which will help improve and expand telehealth services.
  • New Frontier in Fallon, Nevada, was awarded $134,353 to purchase computers, tablets, and telemedicine clinical assistant carts, which will provide secure videoconferencing and transmission of diagnostic information for primary care and mental health services.
  • North Central Texas Community Health Care Center in Wichita Falls, Texas was awarded $531,156 to purchase computers, phones, and telemedicine carts to provide virtual care to patients without access to technology, to help reduce exposure to COVID-19 in the community.
  • North Homes, Inc., in Grand Rapids, Minnesota was awarded $233,446 to purchase tablets and telehealth carts, which will provide secure videoconferencing and the transmission of diagnostic information for performing outpatient services.
  • Northeast Valley Health Corporation in San Fernando, California was awarded $341,392 to acquire tablets, desktop computers, phones, and telehealth services to expand the center’s telehealth capabilities.
  • Northpointe Behavioral Healthcare, a system of providers in Michigan, was awarded $37,679 to purchase laptops, monitors, servers, webcams, and other connected devices to help facilitate telehealth services and increase efficiency in patient care.
  • Oklahoma Department of Corrections in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma was awarded $202,692 to purchase telemedicine carts to increase the quantity and quality of remote health care while decreasing transportation time, safety risks, and exposure to COVID-19 in the community.
  • One Brooklyn Health System in Brooklyn, New York was awarded $354,000 to purchase devices integral to their remote patient monitoring platform including laptops, connected scales, blood pressure cuffs, blood sugar monitors, pulse oximeters, and thermometers, which will allow clinicians to easily access patient data through an online portal, making patient consultation more efficient.
  • Open Door Community Health Centers in Arcata, California was awarded $201,300 to purchase virtual interpretation services, specialized telemedicine carts, and ECG devices that can be operated remotely to provide continuous quality health care in a virtual and private setting.
  • Pediatric and Family Medical Center in Los Angeles, California was awarded $357,096 to purchase laptops, hotspots, telehealth platform subscriptions, and remote monitoring devices to continue providing care to their most vulnerable patients with chronic diseases by reducing the need for patients to travel to appointments and thereby decreasing the risk of exposure to COVID-19.
  • Potomac Valley Hospital in Keyser, West Virginia was awarded $70,669 to purchase telemedicine carts for the provision of telehealth services, which will help the hospital provide routine care for those whose access to transportation has been limited by COVID-19, follow-up appointments for specialty care and surgical services, and remote preventive medical services.
  • Premier Community Healthcare Group in Dade City, Florida was awarded $569,940 for remote monitoring devices as well as upgraded telecommunications infrastructure, which will improve access to care and decrease delays for the most isolated and vulnerable patients, many of whom are underinsured, uninsured, or living below the poverty line.
  • Premium Health, Inc., in Brooklyn, New York was awarded $29,438 to purchase laptops, Voice over Internet Protocol services, as well as an online telemedicine platform, to provide telehealth services for the first time to its patients, most of whom are at or below the poverty line.
  • Prestera Center for Mental Health Services in Huntington, West Virginia was awarded $166,050 to purchase laptops, tablets, and network equipment to expand telehealth services to aid in combatting the rising needs for mental health care, exacerbated by the psychological effects of the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Primary Care Health Services, Inc., in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania was awarded $321,183 to purchase laptops, computers, monitors, internet connectivity, monitoring and management software, and telehealth carts to continue to provide remote care to vulnerable populations and encourage vulnerable populations to stay home to reduce the spread of COVID-19.
  • The Providence Community Health Centers, a system of providers in Rhode Island, was awarded $898,467 to purchase telehealth software and remote patient health monitoring devices, which will facilitate the provision of primary care, including obstetrics, gynecology, behavioral health, asthma/allergy, dental, optometry, and podiatry to patients under the federal poverty line.
  • Riverwood Healthcare Center in Aitkin, Minnesota was awarded $250,488 to purchase internet-connected transmitting hubs and Bluetooth-connected devices to share patient data and improve patient quality of care by bridging the gap between patients and their healthcare providers.
  • Roper St. Francis Hospital-Berkeley in Charleston, South Carolina was awarded $630,678 to purchase remote patient health monitoring equipment, which will be distributed to patients with chronic conditions to provide continuous remote care while decreasing the risk of COVID-19 exposure.
  • SAC Health System in San Bernardino, California was awarded $540,319 to purchase computers, phones, and other networking devices in order to provide access to telehealth services to additional patients, many of whom are in remote and rural areas.
  • San Ysidro Health in San Diego, California was awarded $1,000,000 to purchase computers, monitors, translation software, and remote patient monitoring devices to increase patient engagement and continuity of care in a virtual telehealth environment.
  • Scioto Paint Valley Mental Health Center in Chillicothe, Ohio was awarded $400,712 to purchase laptops, hotspots, network upgrades, and video conferencing subscriptions to expand the clinic’s capabilities in remote patient monitoring by increasing clinician connectivity, allowing health care professionals to work from home, minimizing exposure to COVID-19, and enabling after-hours crisis care.
  • Spartanburg Regional Health Services District in Spartanburg, South Carolina was awarded $152,230 to lease tablets and other telehealth devices, to enable the medical center to increase the number of patients that can be monitored from home, thereby leading to a decrease of both hospitalizations and re-hospitalizations.
  • Speare Memorial Hospital in Plymouth, New Hampshire was awarded $307,324 to purchase tablets and wireless network infrastructure upgrades, to help the hospital expand current telehealth offerings and outreach to unserved populations including long-term care facilities and a veteran housing complex.
  • Elizabeth Medical Center, Inc., a system of hospitals throughout Kentucky, was awarded $949,340 to purchase remote patient monitoring devices, video conferencing subscriptions, telehealth kiosks, and internet connectivity installation to support a dedicated team of virtual health care providers, which will increase primary, pediatric, specialty, and internal medicine care as well as support a 24-hour nurse triage line.
  • Luke’s Hospital in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania was awarded $796,010 to purchase tablets and virtual consultation system equipment, to provide consistent telehealth care and increased specialty care across a large geographic service area and to decrease delays to receiving care.
  • Mary’s Health Wagon in Wise, Virginia was awarded $40,800 to purchase telemedicine carts and connected devices to reduce foot traffic at physical sites, and minimize COVID-19 transmission.
  • Summit Community Care Clinic in Frisco, Colorado was awarded $143,495 to purchase laptops and other equipment necessary to provide secure and efficient medical, dental, and behavioral health care remotely.
  • Tessie Cleveland Community Services Corporation in Los Angeles, California was awarded $394,142 to purchase telecommunication services and connected telehealth devices which will be distributed to patients who do not have access to technology and would otherwise be unable to receive telehealth care.
  • ThedaCare, a system of providers throughout Wisconsin, was awarded $728,429 to purchase tablets, as well as specialized telehealth software, to increase access to specialty care for thousands of patients.
  • United Community Family Services in Norwich, Connecticut was awarded $946,016 to purchase remote patient monitoring equipment, as well as connected mobile devices, which will help serve patients with chronic illnesses and a high risk for COVID-19 complications while also helping to decrease cost barriers to accessing telehealth services.
  • Valley Children’s Hospital in Madera, California was awarded $158,442 to purchase telehealth technology including laptops, webcams, and a telehealth platform, to avoid potential COVID-19 exposure for patients and staff while continuing to provide care to children.
  • Valley Health Team, a consortium of 11 providers in San Joaquin, California was awarded $665,958 to purchase self-service kiosks, tablets, and connected devices to improve their telehealth services and reduce the risk of COVID-19 exposure for patients.
  • Venice Family Clinic in Venice, California was awarded $697,864 to purchase a telehealth platform, servers, routers, switches, and phones to expand accessibility, upgrade the network, and improve flexibility and mobility in providing telehealth services.
  • The Village Health Center in San Diego, California was awarded $261,458 in funding to purchase laptops, docking stations, webcams, headsets, internet and phone services, and telehealth software to expand and provide more effective healthcare offerings.
  • Vista Community Clinic in Vista, California was awarded $894,718 to purchase equipment such as computers, monitors, webcams, and headsets to facilitate and expand telehealth services, along with connected blood pressure monitors that will help providers track patient health and reduce barriers to care.
  • Vocational Instruction Project in Bronx, New York was awarded $515,984 to purchase connected health monitoring devices that will facilitate a patient’s ability to adhere to treatment plans and increase patient engagement remotely, resulting in anticipated improvement in health outcomes.
  • Yakima Valley Council on Alcoholism Triumph Treatment Services in Yakima, Washington was awarded $916,782 to purchase smartphones, tablets, laptops, and online remote patient monitoring and treatment platforms which will enable those economically disadvantaged or severely financially impacted by COVID-19 to have phone and internet-enabled devices, thereby facilitating their participation in virtual outpatient services.