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Fifth Set of Funding Awardees

On December 21, 2021, the FCC released a Press Release announcing the COVID-19 Telehealth awardees.

WASHINGTON, December 21, 2021—The Federal Communications Commission today approved an additional 68 applications for funding commitments totaling $42,702,383 for Round 2 of its COVID-19 Telehealth Program. This is the FCC’s fifth funding announcement of approved Round 2 applications, bringing the total to over $208 million awarded to health care providers in each state, territory, and the District of Columbia.

“As the impact of new variants continue to challenge our healthcare system, the FCC has worked diligently to review and approve funding commitments as part of our COVID-19 Telehealth Program,” said Chairwoman Jessica Rosenworcel. “As we head into 2022, the ability to treat patients and loved ones from the safety of their home is of vital importance.”

On November 9, the FCC’s Wireline Competition Bureau issued a Public Notice announcing an opportunity for all remaining applicants to supplement their applications, as required by Congress.  Remaining applicants had 10 days to supplement their applications which were then evaluated. Today’s funding announcement is the first following that process as outlined in the Round 2 Report and Order.

The FCC’s COVID-19 Telehealth Program supports the efforts of health care providers to continue serving their patients by providing reimbursement for telecommunications services, information services, and connected devices necessary to enable telehealth during the COVID-19 pandemic. Round 2 is a $249.95 million federal initiative that builds on the $200 million program established as part of the CARES Act.

Below is a list of health care providers that were approved for funding in this fifth funding wave (listed alphabetically):

  • Adena Regional Medical Center in Chillicothe, Ohio, was awarded $532,000 for the purchase of remote patient monitoring kits and software, to treat recovering COVID-19 patients and free up additional hospital beds for other patients in need of acute care.
  • AllianceChicago in Chicago, Illinois, was awarded $975,124 for the purchase of devices, such as telemedicine carts, and conferencing software, to facilitate telemedicine delivery to high-risk patients.
  • Aspirus Wausau Hospital in Wausau, Wisconsin, was awarded $999,463 for the purchase of tablets and video conferencing devices to increase telehealth capabilities so providers can interact with patients without unnecessary risk of exposure to COVID-19.
  • Atrium Health, a system of seven hospitals in North Carolina, was awarded $774,414 for the purchase of telemedicine carts, tablets, and connected devices to remotely monitor high-risk patients as they recover from surgery or other medical treatments to avoid in-person contact and reduce the spread of COVID-19.
  • Aunt Martha’s Health and Wellness, a system of five healthcare providers in Illinois, was awarded $156,000 for the purchase of remote blood glucose and blood pressure monitors, for the effective remote treatment of hypertension patients.
  • Axis Health System, with locations throughout Colorado, was awarded $300,027 for the purchase of laptops, tablets, Bluetooth-enabled otoscopes and telehealth software to provide comprehensive telehealth care across a highly rural five-county region of Southwestern Colorado.
  • Beaumont Hospital in Royal Oak, Michigan, as part of a consortium of eight hospitals throughout the state, was awarded $850,789 for the purchase of telehealth software and devices, including tablets, so providers can offer remote routine, non-urgent care, along with remote specialized care so at-risk patients can avoid emergency room visits and reduce their risk of catching COVID-19.
  • Bingham Memorial Hospital in Blackfoot, Idaho, was awarded $840,111 for the purchase of tablets, webcams, and headsets, along with remote monitoring software, to provide telehealth services to patients in a county without ubiquitous broadband coverage.
  • Burnett Medical Center in Grantsburg, Wisconsin was awarded $174,634 for the purchase of an enhanced telephone system and telehealth software, to offer telehealth services to a vulnerable patient population.
  • The Carle Foundation Hospital in Urbana, Illinois, was awarded $643,231 for the purchase of telemedicine carts and telemedicine software, to provide a significant portion of non-urgent care remotely to a patient population that is both rural and low-income.
  • The University of Cincinnati Medical Center in Cincinnati, Ohio, was awarded $1,000,000 for the purchase of headsets, webcams, and telehealth software for telehealth services to new and existing patients, and to allow medically isolated patients to maintain contact with their families and loved ones.
  • The University of Colorado Hospital Authority in Aurora, Colorado was awarded $779,447 for the purchase of infrastructure upgrades and telehealth devices to expand virtual behavioral health visits for patients.
  • The Community Care Network of Kansas, a consortium of providers throughout the state, was awarded $404,923 for the purchase of devices that will enhance internet connectivity for health care providers throughout the state, thereby enabling providers that had previously lacked the capacity to provide telehealth to begin offering those services to vulnerable patients.
  • The Community Health Center of Central Missouri in Jefferson City, Missouri, was awarded $329,215 for the purchase of telehealth devices, which will allow for seamless, remote communications between patients and health care providers, and virtual patient visits while limiting in-person interaction.
  • Community Health Center of the North Country in Canton, New York was awarded $328,104 for the purchase of telemedicine video conferencing equipment, telemedicine carts, and remote patient monitoring equipment, to provide behavioral health, dietary, and medication counseling to developmentally disabled residents, as well as behavioral health and primary care services to patients in rural New York.
  • Community Health Centers, Inc., with 15 clinics throughout Florida, was awarded $956,655 for the purchase of laptops and telemedicine software, to expand telehealth capacities and improve access for clients who face transportation challenges and other barriers to care.
  • Community HealthNet in Gary, Indiana, was awarded $885,000 for the purchase of laptops, telephones, and remote monitoring devices that will allow healthcare providers to provide remote care to vulnerable patients throughout its medically underserved service area.
  • Compass Community Health in Portsmouth, Ohio, was awarded $151,879 for the purchase of cameras, tablets, remote monitoring devices, and telehealth software to provide high-quality patient care and care management within a telehealth setting launched in response to the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Compass Health in St. Peters, Missouri, was awarded $967,371 for the purchase of laptops and telehealth kits, for patients to monitor their weight, blood pressure, temperature, and oxygen readings from home, and avoid unnecessary in-person interactions.
  • Cook County Health in Chicago, Illinois was awarded $513,356 for the purchase of laptops, monitors, and remote monitoring devices to track vulnerable patients’ vital statistics and recommend appropriate follow-up care while minimizing unnecessary in-person contact.
  • Coos County Family Health Services in Berlin, New Hampshire, was awarded $68,750 for the purchase of telehealth-enabled smartphones to allow providers to remotely communicate with patients, many of whom do not own smartphones and would otherwise be unable to receive remote telemedicine care.
  • County of Los Angeles – Department of Health Services in Los Angeles, California was awarded $1,000,000 for the purchase of telehealth software, services, and equipment to deliver real-time video visits with patients and to facilitate tele-radiology services.
  • CoxHealth Consortium in Springfield, Missouri, was awarded $553,551 for the purchase of laptops, monitors, and headsets, which will allow providers and patients to interact remotely and minimize patients’ potential exposure to COVID-19.
  • The Family Medicine Clinic for Health Equity in Denver, Colorado was awarded $360,200 for the purchase of telehealth kits and remote patient monitoring services to provide telehealth care to its under-served, low-income patient population.
  • Heart of Florida Health Center in Ocala, Florida, as part of a system of seven providers throughout the state, was awarded $165,509 for the purchase of devices, including laptops, monitors, and webcams, which will allow for the utilization of remote monitoring software and other telehealth services to enhance remote patient care.
  • Henry County Memorial Hospital in New Castle, Indiana was awarded $338,511 for the purchase of remote monitoring devices, including blood-pressure cuffs and scales, which will allow patients to monitor their vital signs and communicate with their providers from the safety of their own homes.
  • Hutchinson Regional Medical Center in Hutchinson, Kansas, as part of a consortium of six hospitals across the state, was awarded $1,000,000 for the purchase of telehealth servers and enhanced network capacity so health care providers can offer telehealth services to low-income patients residing in sparsely populated rural areas.
  • Jackson Parish Hospital in Jonesboro, Louisiana was awarded $442,144 for the purchase of telemedicine carts and remote-monitoring devices to allow providers to conduct telemedicine encounters and consult with specialists remotely by providing remote-viewing capabilities in each exam room.
  • Kalkaska Memorial Health Center in Kalkaska, Michigan was awarded $526,250 for the purchase of remote monitoring software and smartphones for enhanced patient safety and to facilitate communication between isolated patients and their loved ones.
  • Kenosha Community Health Center in Kenosha, Wisconsin was awarded $988,540 for the purchase of telehealth equipment to extend care to patients in rural areas with chronic diseases and COVID-19.
  • Kettering Medical Center in Kettering, Ohio, was awarded $273,194 for the purchase of tablets and telehealth software, to offer patients non-urgent medical care from the safety of their own homes and reduce the spread of COVID-19.
  • Klickitat County Public Hospital in Goldendale, Washington, was awarded $711,739 for the purchase of tablets, webcams, and remote monitoring kits to enhance its telemedicine offerings as the only health care provider in a sparsely populated area.
  • LaSante Health Center in Brooklyn, New York was awarded $867,684 for the purchase of laptops, cameras, and telehealth software to provide telehealth service for low-income patients with a first language other than English.
  • Little Rivers Health Care in Bradford, Vermont was awarded $872,381 for the purchase of a telehealth platform, network equipment, broadband connectivity, and connected devices to implement a remote patient monitoring and treatment platform and expand delivery of services to the most vulnerable patients in their service area.
  • The Louisiana Primary Care Association in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, which represents 39 community health centers across the state, was awarded $890,860 for the purchase of remote monitoring devices to treat low-income and impoverished patients living in rural areas via telehealth.
  • The Lower Umpqua Hospital District in Reedsport, Oregon, was awarded $989,628 for the purchase of laptops, monitors, webcams, and telehealth software, to offer telehealth services for the low income, high-risk and vulnerable rural population that the hospital serves.
  • Marana Health Center in Marana, Arizona was awarded $794,998 for the purchase of telehealth equipment, tablets, and Wi-Fi connectivity to allow curbside visits, tele-dental visits, and mental health services with enhanced video and audio.
  • Mercy Hospital Fort Smith, as part of a consortium of hospitals in Arkansas, was awarded $647,154 for the purchase of telehealth devices, which will allow for instant, remote communication between hospitalized patients and their caregivers, and will help health care providers minimize their exposure to COVID-19.
  • Monongahela Valley Hospital in Monongahela, Pennsylvania was awarded $498,726 for the purchase of remote patient monitoring devices to improve the health of patients and reduce their risk of COVID-19 exposure.
  • Na Pu’uwai, as part of the Native Hawaiian Health Care System throughout Hawaii, was awarded $275,000 for the purchase of connected telehealth devices and data connectivity to use telehealth to treat patients living on remote islands.
  • Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus, Ohio was awarded $964,076 for the purchase of smartphones and laptops to provide care to pediatric patients for whom a remote visit via telehealth reduces the risk of contracting a COVID-19 infection.
  • Neighborhood Healthcare, a system of Community Health Centers throughout California, was awarded $998,675 for the purchase of telehealth software and remote monitoring kits, containing tablets and Bluetooth-enabled blood pressure monitors, so patients can safely and securely communicate with their healthcare providers.
  • Neosho Memorial Regional Medical Center in Chanute, Kansas was awarded $176,054 for the purchase of tablets, laptops, and other telehealth connected devices to enable nurses and clinicians to meet with patients in their homes or designated non-emergent treatment sites for preventative medical interventions.
  • Northern Arizona Healthcare in Flagstaff, Arizona, was awarded $969,884 for the purchase of remote patient monitoring kits, such as Bluetooth-enabled blood pressure monitors, scales, and oximeters, along with cellular-data-enabled tablets, so patients can quickly and effectively provide health information to healthcare providers and receive necessary care.
  • Northwestern Memorial HealthCare, a consortium of hospitals throughout Illinois, was awarded $1,000,000 for the purchase of cameras and remote monitoring software, to offer effective patient screening for COVID-19 patients, and to allow health care providers to quickly and efficiently communicate remotely with patients.
  • The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and James Cancer Hospital in Columbus, Ohio was awarded $526,613 for the purchase of laptops with integrated cameras to perform telehealth visits, to connect with patients in quarantine settings, and to promote ongoing counseling for patients with increased anxiety or depression.
  • Piedmont Healthcare, a system of hospitals throughout Georgia, was awarded $197,789 for the purchase of remote monitoring kits, including Bluetooth-enabled pulse oximeters, blood pressure devices, and scales, to provide improved remote care throughout the hospital system.
  • Pine Rest Christian Mental Health Services in Grand Rapids, Michigan, was awarded $398,825 for the purchase of tablets and telehealth software to provide patients with remote mental health care services while reducing the risk of patients and providers transmitting COVID-19.
  • Putnam County Hospital in Greencastle, Indiana, was awarded $934,736 for the purchase of remote monitoring software, along with laptops and webcams, which will allow for the provision of telehealth service at the hospital and at remote clinics.
  • Rehoboth McKinley Christian Health Care Services in Gallup, New Mexico, was awarded $697,179 for the purchase of remote patient monitoring kits, which will allow patients to test their vital signs and remotely convey that information to their health care providers, along with laptops, which health care providers will use to provide telehealth to a wide array of patients.
  • The Ritchie County Primary Care Association in Harrisville, West Virginia, was awarded $960,444 for the purchase of telehealth kiosks and software, to help with COVID-19 screening and primary medical care for vulnerable, low-income, and elderly patients with chronic conditions.
  • The Sacopee Valley Health Center in Porter, Maine was awarded $616,532 for the purchase of Bluetooth-enabled blood pressure cuffs, pulse oximeters, and glucometers, to remotely transmit vital statistics of vulnerable patients to healthcare providers and reduce the need for non-urgent, in-person consultations.
  • Seattle Children’s Hospital in Seattle, Washington, was awarded $1,000,000 for the purchase of telehealth software and equipment to minimize exposure to COVID-19 via telehealth and use virtual care to maintain the care of less acutely ill children in their own communities.
  • Shands Jacksonville Medical Center in Jacksonville, Florida was awarded $470,553 for the purchase of remote monitoring devices, Bluetooth-enabled devices such as thermometers, and telehealth carts, to provide remote treatment and so hospitalized patients can maintain communications with their friends and family.
  • Sinai Health System, a consortium of five hospitals in Chicago, Illinois, was awarded $1,000,000 for the purchase of devices, such as laptops, tablets, and webcams, along with telehealth software, which will allow healthcare providers to offer remote care to vulnerable patients and reduce the risk of COVID-19 exposure.
  • Siouxland Community Health Center in Sioux City, Iowa was awarded $977,978 for the purchase of Bluetooth-enabled oximeters, blood-pressure cuffs, and otoscopes for enhanced remote care and to reduce the burden of a surge of in-person visits.
  • Sky Lakes Medical Center in Klamath Falls, Oregon, was awarded $226,092 for the purchase of connected devices, such as blood pressure cuffs, scales, and thermometers, along with tablets and headsets, for telehealth services to provide continued quality healthcare.
  • Southeast, Inc. in Columbus, Ohio was awarded $51,733 for the purchase of telehealth equipment, including webcams, tablets and remote connected devices, to ensure vulnerable populations can continue to receive health care services during the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • Claire Medical Center in Morehead, Kentucky, was awarded $308,894 for the purchase of laptops, tablets, and teleconferencing software to provide telehealth throughout its five-county region of northeastern Kentucky that is medically underserved, socioeconomically disadvantaged, and entirely rural.
  • Joseph’s Hospital in Clearwater, Florida, as part of a consortium of eleven hospitals throughout Florida, was awarded $416,403 for the purchase of remote monitoring software, to monitor COVID-19 patients and for the provision of high-quality care while reducing the spread of the virus.
  • Summit Pacific Medical Center in Elma, Washington, was awarded $977,994 for the purchase of tablets, laptops, and remote monitoring kits, including Bluetooth-enabled oximeters and blood pressure monitors, to deploy mobile and stationary kiosks in community centers, community halls, and schools throughout its rural service area to increase equitable access for its low-income patient population.
  • Sun Life Family Health Center in Casa Grande, Arizona was awarded $907,887 for the purchase of laptops, tablets, and Bluetooth-enabled blood pressure monitoring devices to facilitate more effective health care to a vulnerable patient population.
  • Talbert House Health Center in Middletown, Ohio was awarded $153,208 for the purchase of remote monitoring devices to expand their telehealth footprint and manage care for patients with chronic conditions, maternity patients, and to assist providers with making clinical decisions in the virtual space.
  • Trinitas Regional Medical Center in Elizabeth, New Jersey was awarded $639,832 for the purchase of telehealth services and equipment, including tablets and computers, for ongoing remote psychotherapy, clinical assessment, patient monitoring, medication management, and crisis intervention.
  • Union Hospital in Terre Haute, Indiana was awarded $173,450 for the purchase of remote monitoring devices and Bluetooth-enabled oximeters, to remotely monitor the progress of COVID-19 and respiratory affected patients in their own home.
  • University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center in Cleveland, Ohio was awarded $999,015 for the purchase of telehealth devices for use in inpatient wards to communicate safely with provider specialists and to reduce unnecessary site-to-site transfers and limit exposure to COVID-19.
  • Watauga Medical Center in Boone, North Carolina was awarded $131,975 for the purchase of remote monitoring software and Bluetooth-enabled blood glucose meters to allow for the safe and effective remote care of vulnerable patients while allowing them to remain at home and minimize their risk of catching or spreading COVID-19.
  • The Westchester County Health Care Corporation in Valhalla, New York, was awarded $1,000,000 for the purchase of remote monitoring software and video equipment, which will allow for the creation of a “tele-ICU” for the provision of remote care for hospitalized patients, thereby ensuring that patients can receive quality care while reducing the risk of COVID-19 exposure for health care providers.